Indermaur Media, inc.
Visual Narrative
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Indermaur Media - Visual Narrative Blog by Scott Indermaur

Informational blog about techniques, ideas,industry trends, clients and projects of Indermaur Media. Written by Scott Indermaur, professional corporate photographer.

Posts in Video
Steps to Create a Successful Corporate Video Production
 
Video Production Crew in Nebraska
 

Indermaur media has done many corporate video productions ranging from simple videos to more sophisticated in planning and creation. In some cases, it is unscripted with subjects speaking from their heart. In other cases, it is imperative for the words to be exact and in that case we use a TelePrompter. No matter how sophisticated a corporate video project may be, creating a video has three necessary steps to create a successful corporate video production. Pre-production, Production, and Post-production.


Video Pre-production

This is the stage that is critical to successful video production. In this stage, we create the story and messaging for the target audience. There may be a simple conversation with the client regarding vision and goals or much more time spent on discussions, scheduling, putting together the perfect production crew, shopping for props, casting talent, hiring the actors, and pre-interviewing subjects. One example of where pre-production for video production is essential:

Boston Multi Media Video Production:

We created a two day Boston multimedia project for a financial retirement product. The experienced crew and actors of 30 people included me as the photographer, a videographer to create b-roll for their website, wardrobe stylist, makeup artist, producer, art director, assistants, grips and the client. The pre-production included scouting locations throughout Boston to convey the lifestyle photography and video we needed, applying and receiving proper permits, casting and hiring the actors, creating a style of wardrobe for the talent to wear, purchasing props for the video scenes and creating a detailed schedule. A few logistics we included where people needed to park, how to get the crew fed, dealing with police officers when they question what we were doing and needed to see our permits, among other things.

Social Media Marketing Campaign In RI:

A Rhode Island healthcare social media marketing campaign included commercial photography and testimonial video. This project included me as the photographer and videographer, a multimedia assistant, an art director, two client representatives, makeup artist, and a producer. The critical part was working with the client to locate the potential Rhode Island Business owners and subjects that are in line with their marketing campaign. After identifying the subjects, scouting was necessary for some subjects to find the ideal location to capture them in, we applied for permits, and we created a detailed schedule.

Video Production Projects - Boston MA & Nebraska

This stage is where everyone is involved. It is magic to see entire crews work as one and create a video from the client's concept and vision. It can be as simple as myself as the cameraman with a video grip for assistance, and we work as a team to create video, capture sound and have conversations with subjects in a video interview style. At times it is more focused on me as the director and video crew that handles the multimedia logistics. Two examples of where video production is essential:

  1. A Boston compliance training video production included a multimedia production crew of eight, producer, make-up artist, three client art directors, and 10 actors. We used the portion of the client's office space that was empty at the time. One of our tasks was to purchase office props to make the office look as if it was active. Day 1 included spending time setting up the video equipment and propping the offices with items like computers, flowers, pens to make it look dynamic.

  2. A Nebraska community bank video story that was unscripted with subjects speaking from the heart. It took a crew of 4, the client and dozens of subjects for heartfelt video interviews. We spent weeks developing the story and pre-qualifying the subjects to create a video story about the vibrant community and its connection to a community bank. The critical part of the production was to be on schedule and open to shifting the schedule and direction of the story if a new detail comes up in our conversations with the individual in the community. This style is more in line with a journalistic style and being in tune with the message, goals and agile enough to shift direction if needed.

Video Post production

post production is gathering all the video clips, sound and putting together to create a meaningful video story. In some cases, it is as simple as working with a script and going back to our video production notes on what video clips we’re best. With other times, it is listening to all the clips and putting the story together from the original pre-production goals and vision in mind. After that, we share the video online for client feedback, and we typically go into post-production a few rounds to refine the corporate video. One example of corporate assignment post-production:

  1. Connecticut non-profit video marketing campaign that shared their mission. In this case, the crew was a video assistant and me. We had two clients representative that handles the interview questioning and oversaw art direction. All the subjects spoke unscripted and from their heart. We created several videos with different topics for a capital campaign for their non-profit. Each had a different matter, and we listened to all the clips to refine the non-profit's messaging and create a strong fund drive campaign.


High quality corporate video content is successful when you can engage the viewer. To create a seamless and robust commercial video or corporate video, you must pay attention to all stages of video production. Creating a detailed schedule and paying attention to the details is essential to create a successful corporate video production.

Rhode Island Commercial Photographer for a Restaurant
Rhode Island Commercial  Photographer for a Restaurant with a video timelapse in RI

There are many types of commercial photography and advertising campaigns. A number of my advertising photography projects and corporate video assignments are for small and medium-sized businesses that I thoroughly enjoy. Having lots of experience with more significant projects allows me to create an even stronger plan for smaller marketing campaigns.

Typically a smaller project involves myself and an assistant with different levels of collaboration and expectations with the client. In most cases the client wants me to create a majority of the art direction and production of images. We have conversations on their vision, goals, brand and the narrative they want to share. Also, I will research their presence and competitors in what they are sharing visually, creatively and with the written story. In other cases, I work closely with the client in creating visuals with their vision.

The smaller multimedia projects are wonderful because such a significant portion of the creative collaboration process is baked in without managing a large logistics crew to make it happen.

Successful Restaurant Photography Project - Cafe And Bakery

I recently completed a Rhode Island restaurant photography assignment and their 2nd location for the pantry. The client hired me to photograph their restaurant and bakery to capture the fresh, high quality food they prepare along with the fun personality of their staff. I also created their new websites for both the cafe and bakery; which allowed me to be a partner in their creative process from conception to publication.

We visited their Rhode Island locations a few times to capture candid style photography that portrays this vision for use on their new website and for their social media. At times I photographed people in action and other times asked the barista to hold up a delicious pastry towards the camera to create a social media style photograph.

The production crew was just myself as the Rhode Island commercial photographer and the owner, collaborating to create their impactful marketing photography visuals that tell their narrative and make a strong marketing presence. During the photography sessions, the restaurant owner was with me to point out potential strong visuals, and I shared my ideas with her. We made a terrific visual team as her small business narrative unfolded.

I kept the actual production simple with using ambient lighting and an occasional 1-2 Profoto A1 small battery flash units. This allowed me to work without an assistant and be nimble in a small, busy bakery and restaurant. Most restaurants have limited space so it’s easier when I am solo vs. working with an assistant. It brings me back to my newspaper photojournalist days of working creatively, but nimble and fast. This technique allowed me to stay out of the way during active business hours when they are serving their customers.

Also, I suggested we create a video for their home page of their website. I then created 2 videos from time-lapse photography to capture the busyness of their locations with a social media style video. This added action, movement and energy to their website’s opening page. It’s become a much watched, very popular video!

I enjoy working at all levels of production, as I move a project from pre to post production workflow. As a commercial photographer, every advertising or marketing photography project is a unique experience. From the planning of the types of a commercial advertising campaign, envisioning the visual narrative, to the coloration of the actual photography and video productions in my home state is very rewarding. Being creative with images or adding a social media video clip as a new style and asset for the client makes projects more exciting; but more importantly, it delivers what type of narrative the client wants, which can be challenging and very rewarding. While I travel nationally for video and commercial photography projects, I do enjoy the journey as a Rhode Island commercial photographer - Rhode island has so much to offer!

The Day I Realized I Was a Multi-Media Producer

Creating stories with vision….

Multimedia Producer.jpg

It finally hit me. 

About three years ago, I changed the name of my company to Indermaur Media. I had a thriving corporate photography business based in RI (with clients nationwide), that included commercial and editorial photography, but began branching out into other forms of media. By changing the name I wanted to set the course, and the intention, to operate in the fields of photography, video and full production to create even stronger visual narratives for my clients.

Recently, I sat back to take stock. I had created video productions for new clients, my photography work continued, and I had maintained my corporate work; but something was different. I was trying to find the best description of what I do now. New projects were incorporating photos and video, social media projects, and creating original content to deliver the best story possible. I found myself in a position of Directing and Producing more than before, and not even operating a camera.

Indermaur Media is now a Multimedia Production Company

So, I reached out to my daughter, Caitlin Indermaur, who is a Video Producer on the west coast. She has been a muse of mine, and in addition, my assistant before she even graduated from high school. We've collaborated on many projects through her college years and before she moved out west. For all those years, she always has excellent feedback and thoughtful insight. She immediately said, "Dad, You're a Multimedia Producer." 

For me, a Multimedia Producer is responsible for telling stories using video and still photography. I often manage the entire production process: generating and executing ideas, meeting budgets and deadlines, and expanding the team when necessary to accommodate a client's vision. On some projects, I am primarily a still photographer, on others a video camera operator. Then there are times I am simply the lead Producer, managing and directing the team to create a story. So, I had to agree - I am now a Multimedia Producer. 

For myself, and Indermaur Media, new modern "photography" delivers a much richer story when a tool box of skills and an excellent team can come together to execute and deliver the finest visual project possible. I continue to share the nuts and bolts of this transitional process in my Visual Creative Coach business. 

Using a Video Teleprompter to Deliver Your Message

Coming from a photojournalistic background I always enjoy creating heartfelt videos and photography with people speaking from the heart to develop humanistic stories.

I enjoy the approach of having a “conversation” with the subject vs. a formal “interview”. While the subject and I may share questions beforehand, we keep the questions and answers short and spoken in the moment. Typically the individual does not respond looking directly into the camera. I prefer this technique as speaking from the heart humanizes the subject vs written message they are reading. 

Recently I began working with the Executive Career Coach Lori Giuttari, to produce a video course for her clients. She needs to speak directly to her clients and be on topic for videos that last about 5-15 minutes. 

This is when a teleprompter comes in very handy. The teleprompter I use displays the written script from an iPad and reflects it onto a piece of glass. The camera is directly behind the glass. Therefore she is reading the text while looking into the camera in order to be connected with the viewer.

She was able to write out her lesson beforehand, and practice while recording herself with a voice recorder, in order to evaluate her messaging and timing. This allowed her to fine-tune her modules for the video course. 

Being able to use a teleprompter, speaking directly to clients, allowed me to focus on connecting with them, as opposed to worrying about every single point I touched upon.
— Lori Giuttari
Life Coach-Teleprompter

When we created the video she felt comfortable with her tightly prepared message and by seeing her text through the teleprompter, it allowed her to be sure she covered all essential parts or her lesson.

Both techniques of using or not using a teleprompter have their purpose in delivering your message and story. It’s important to decide what type of message you want to provide and who your audience will be. 

6 Essential Things for a Strong Photography and Video Project
photographer-videographer for commercial multimedia projects in Boston MA

Back in the "day" photographers were hired for photography and videographers for videos. Today you can find photographers that also create video and videographers that take photographs. The range of experience, style, and abilities are diverse.

Hiring an individual that has the experience as both a photographer and videographer is one way to create heartfelt and connected real life stories with video and photography. They can be used for a company's advertising campaign, in-house corporate uses, social media and online content.

In recent years I have enjoyed commercial multimedia assignments in Boston, RI and New England like this because they include "from the hip" style photography, and storytelling through video; while others are more sophisticated in creation. For example, I may take the portraits of an executive team and then engaged them in a conversation/interview on video for a simple, but more in-depth assignment.

Here are a few tips on what to look for when choosing your multimedia partner.

1. Find a photographer or videographer experienced with both photography and video. Shooting still photography and video are two different mind and skill sets. Approaching a subject for photography is different than with a video interview.

2. Find a multimedia (photographer-videographer) crew who can work quick on their feet and are creative in their approach to a setup.

3. A producer is an excellent asset for successful multimedia project management. They help with permits, finding professional actors or "real" people, scheduling, putting together a crew, making last minute requests happen, among other things. An individual within your company or the photographer-videographer may be able to produce as well.

4. Allow simple setups so photography and video can easily be captured. This keeps the team moving to get lots of good visuals in a day's work, and can be used for the long-term.

5. Have the day planned out - This sounds like a no-brainer, though it is critical and is sometimes overlooked. Keep the schedule tight, organized and if the crew is running ahead or behind schedule, let them know. I always like to pad some extra time for those setups that have unexpected delays. Remember to allow enough time for video and photography to be created.

6. Have a vision - you may only need one setup. Focus on making an excellent portrait and interview instead of creating multiple setups. This significantly streamlines the editing process. Keep it simple and narrow down your wants and needs before the shoot.